Longitudinal effects of aging on plasma proteins levels in older adults - associations with kidney function and hemoglobin levels.

Lind L, Sundström J, Larsson A, Lampa E, Ärnlöv J, Ingelsson E

PLoS ONE 14 (2) e0212060 [2019-02-25; online 2019-02-25]

A targeted proteomics chip has been shown to be useful to discover novel associations of proteins with cardiovascular disease. We investigated how these proteins change with aging, and whether this change is related to a decline in kidney function, or to a change in hemoglobin levels. In the Prospective Investigation of the Vasculature in Uppsala Seniors (PIVUS) study, including 1,016 participants from the general population aged 70 at baseline, 84 proteins were measured at ages 70, 75, 80. At these occasions, glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) was estimated and the hemoglobin levels were measured. Sixty-one of the 84 evaluated proteins changed significantly during the 10-year follow-up (multiple testing-adjusted alpha = 0.00059), most showing an increase. The change in eGFR was inversely related to changes of protein levels for the vast majority of proteins (74%). The change in hemoglobin was significantly related to the change in 40% of the evaluated proteins, with no obvious preference of the direction of these relationships. The majority of evaluated proteins increased with aging in adults. Therefore, normal ranges for proteins might be given in age-strata. The increase in protein levels was associated with the degree of reduction in eGFR for the majority of proteins, while no clear pattern was seen for the relationships between the proteins and the change in hemoglobin levels. Studies on changes in urinary proteins are warranted to understand the association between the reduction in eGFR and increase in plasma protein levels.

Clinical Biomarkers [Service]

QC bibliography QC xrefs

PubMed 30802263

DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0212060

Crossref 10.1371/journal.pone.0212060

pii: PONE-D-18-32255
pmc: PMC6388926