Affinity proteomics reveals elevated muscle proteins in plasma of children with cerebral malaria.

Bachmann J, Burté F, Pramana S, Conte I, Brown BJ, Orimadegun AE, Ajetunmobi WA, Afolabi NK, Akinkunmi F, Omokhodion S, Akinbami FO, Shokunbi WA, Kampf C, Pawitan Y, Uhlén M, Sodeinde O, Schwenk JM, Wahlgren M, Fernandez-Reyes D, Nilsson P

PLoS Pathog. 10 (4) e1004038 [2014-04-00; online 2014-04-17]

Systemic inflammation and sequestration of parasitized erythrocytes are central processes in the pathophysiology of severe Plasmodium falciparum childhood malaria. However, it is still not understood why some children are more at risks to develop malaria complications than others. To identify human proteins in plasma related to childhood malaria syndromes, multiplex antibody suspension bead arrays were employed. Out of the 1,015 proteins analyzed in plasma from more than 700 children, 41 differed between malaria infected children and community controls, whereas 13 discriminated uncomplicated malaria from severe malaria syndromes. Markers of oxidative stress were found related to severe malaria anemia while markers of endothelial activation, platelet adhesion and muscular damage were identified in relation to children with cerebral malaria. These findings suggest the presence of generalized vascular inflammation, vascular wall modulations, activation of endothelium and unbalanced glucose metabolism in severe malaria. The increased levels of specific muscle proteins in plasma implicate potential muscle damage and microvasculature lesions during the course of cerebral malaria.

Plasma Profiling [Collaborative]

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PubMed 24743550

DOI 10.1371/journal.ppat.1004038

Crossref 10.1371/journal.ppat.1004038

PPATHOGENS-D-13-01973

pmc PMC3990714