A beak size locus in Darwin's finches facilitated character displacement during a drought.

Lamichhaney S, Han F, Berglund J, Wang C, Almén MS, Webster MT, Grant BR, Grant PR, Andersson L

Science 352 (6284) 470-474 [2016-04-22; online 2016-04-23]

Ecological character displacement is a process of morphological divergence that reduces competition for limited resources. We used genomic analysis to investigate the genetic basis of a documented character displacement event in Darwin's finches on Daphne Major in the Galápagos Islands: The medium ground finch diverged from its competitor, the large ground finch, during a severe drought. We discovered a genomic region containing the HMGA2 gene that varies systematically among Darwin's finch species with different beak sizes. Two haplotypes that diverged early in the radiation were involved in the character displacement event: Genotypes associated with large beak size were at a strong selective disadvantage in medium ground finches (selection coefficient s = 0.59). Thus, a major locus has apparently facilitated a rapid ecological diversification in the adaptive radiation of Darwin's finches.

Bioinformatics Compute and Storage [Service]

NGI Uppsala (SNP&SEQ Technology Platform) [Service]

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PubMed 27102486

DOI 10.1126/science.aad8786

Crossref 10.1126/science.aad8786

352/6284/470