Genetic comorbidity between major depression and cardio-metabolic traits, stratified by age at onset of major depression.

Hagenaars SP, Coleman JRI, Choi SW, Gaspar H, Adams MJ, Howard DM, Hodgson K, Traylor M, Air TM, Andlauer TFM, Arolt V, Baune BT, Binder EB, Blackwood DHR, Boomsma DI, Campbell A, Cearns M, Czamara D, Dannlowski U, Domschke K, de Geus EJC, Hamilton SP, Hayward C, Hickie IB, Hottenga JJ, Ising M, Jones I, Jones L, Kutalik Z, Lucae S, Martin NG, Milaneschi Y, Mueller-Myhsok B, Owen MJ, Padmanabhan S, Penninx BWJH, Pistis G, Porteous DJ, Preisig M, Ripke S, Shyn SI, Sullivan PF, Whitfield JB, Wray NR, McIntosh AM, Deary IJ, Breen G, Lewis CM

Am. J. Med. Genet. B Neuropsychiatr. Genet. - (-) - [2020-07-18; online 2020-07-18]

It is imperative to understand the specific and shared etiologies of major depression and cardio-metabolic disease, as both traits are frequently comorbid and each represents a major burden to society. This study examined whether there is a genetic association between major depression and cardio-metabolic traits and if this association is stratified by age at onset for major depression. Polygenic risk scores analysis and linkage disequilibrium score regression was performed to examine whether differences in shared genetic etiology exist between depression case control status (N cases = 40,940, N controls = 67,532), earlier (N = 15,844), and later onset depression (N = 15,800) with body mass index, coronary artery disease, stroke, and type 2 diabetes in 11 data sets from the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium, Generation Scotland, and UK Biobank. All cardio-metabolic polygenic risk scores were associated with depression status. Significant genetic correlations were found between depression and body mass index, coronary artery disease, and type 2 diabetes. Higher polygenic risk for body mass index, coronary artery disease, and type 2 diabetes was associated with both early and later onset depression, while higher polygenic risk for stroke was associated with later onset depression only. Significant genetic correlations were found between body mass index and later onset depression, and between coronary artery disease and both early and late onset depression. The phenotypic associations between major depression and cardio-metabolic traits may partly reflect their overlapping genetic etiology irrespective of the age depression first presents.

NGI Uppsala (SNP&SEQ Technology Platform) [Service]

National Genomics Infrastructure [Service]

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PubMed 32681593

DOI 10.1002/ajmg.b.32807

Crossref 10.1002/ajmg.b.32807