Bifidobacteria-mediated immune system imprinting early in life.

Henrick BM, Rodriguez L, Lakshmikanth T, Pou C, Henckel E, Arzoomand A, Olin A, Wang J, Mikes J, Tan Z, Chen Y, Ehrlich AM, Bernhardsson AK, Mugabo CH, Ambrosiani Y, Gustafsson A, Chew S, Brown HK, Prambs J, Bohlin K, Mitchell RD, Underwood MA, Smilowitz JT, German JB, Frese SA, Brodin P

Cell 184 (15) 3884-3898.e11 [2021-07-22; online 2021-06-17]

Immune-microbe interactions early in life influence the risk of allergies, asthma, and other inflammatory diseases. Breastfeeding guides healthier immune-microbe relationships by providing nutrients to specialized microbes that in turn benefit the host's immune system. Such bacteria have co-evolved with humans but are now increasingly rare in modern societies. Here we show that a lack of bifidobacteria, and in particular depletion of genes required for human milk oligosaccharide (HMO) utilization from the metagenome, is associated with systemic inflammation and immune dysregulation early in life. In breastfed infants given Bifidobacterium infantis EVC001, which expresses all HMO-utilization genes, intestinal T helper 2 (Th2) and Th17 cytokines were silenced and interferon β (IFNβ) was induced. Fecal water from EVC001-supplemented infants contains abundant indolelactate and B. infantis-derived indole-3-lactic acid (ILA) upregulated immunoregulatory galectin-1 in Th2 and Th17 cells during polarization, providing a functional link between beneficial microbes and immunoregulation during the first months of life.

Cellular Immunomonitoring [Collaborative]

NGI Stockholm (Genomics Applications) [Service]

NGI Stockholm (Genomics Production) [Service]

National Genomics Infrastructure [Service]

PubMed 34143954

DOI 10.1016/j.cell.2021.05.030

Crossref 10.1016/j.cell.2021.05.030

pii: S0092-8674(21)00660-7